f00lishpe0ple:

The Home Sweet Home: London

FoolishPeople arrive back in central London after touring the UK’s most beautiful independent cinemas, to manifest Strange Factories (2013) for one final performance at the Cinema Museum.

This night will be a unique celebration of what we carnival and circus folk call the Home Sweet Home: the final show of the season. After the haunting, you will be invited to mingle with ghosts of the silver screen at the after party.

Presented as a reimagined live performance, this presentation explores a different aspect of the story, exposing the myth of Stronheim from a new perspective. So if you visited the settlement in 2013, and are already a member of the Imaginari we have further secrets to share.

Tickets available now.

Reblogged from f00lishpe0ple

‘Strange Factories’ is an independent feature film that tells the story of a writer trying to unfold the mystery of a fable in a world haunted by a phantasmagoric fiction.

My work as writer and director on ‘Strange Factories’ has afforded me the time to reflect on what it is to be a storyteller. In turn I’ve felt a deep connection grow within to the history of storytelling and the storytellers who left us long ago, but perhaps still exist in the narratives that will always be part of us. Their blood still courses through the stories that communicate the mystery at the heart of all our lives.

"Street lights cast shadows across the entrance to a theatre. The word EMETH is presented on an illuminated sign."

Why do we tell stories?

Humans literally told themselves into existence. We are constructed from a million narratives that have accompanied us across time, exhaled and etched on every conceivable surface, so that even in the darkest times we would never forget who we are.

What we call reality and every element in it is constructed from stories and myth. The surface of fiction is present everywhere.

What is physics if not a beautiful story, told in an intricate language of symbols and meaning that we’re still very much engaged in the act of telling, as we travel far deeper to the heart of its truth.

Every interaction and reaction in our lives are nodes of a story. Some stories we are part of, others we’re mere walk on characters, passing across the field of vision on the narrative plane of view.

We understand the nature of good and evil through the stories we are told as children and we mix these perspectives to become part of us as we age and travel through our lives. Sometimes we play the villain in another’s tale, the antagonist who comes to destroy. In other moments we are victims, martyrs or even a saviour and just once in a while we are the eternal hero. Reincarnated through mythic tales time and time again, a memory of something so powerful it will never fail the true memory of what we are.

"The Sun burns bright in the sky above a clearing in a forest. A crowd of people stand at the edge of the tree line, staring into the darkness that the trees hide."

For good and for bad, stories have changed my life, altering my perceptions of self, time, reality and fiction.

The stories that I have channelled as a writer have connected me to the world in a way that forces me to see the bright and hidden truths in the undercurrents of the fiction that ebb and flow all around us.

The best storytellers lose themselves inside their stories.

Some go insane at the sight of their own lives reflected back in the challenges their characters face and in turn come to learn how they too are a character in a grand tale that stretches beyond the confines of our lives and understanding.

"Through the eye holes of a mask we see the white pages are bright and give off luminosity."

The worse time I ever endured in my life, was a period of six years in my own story, where it felt like I was playing a character who held no truth, forced to exist in a formulaic story I had never intended to create. If my life had been a book during those years, I would have closed the cover and stopped reading.

Life has but one purpose: To tell the story of who we are honestly and to best of our ability, no matter the cost.

It takes time and effort to perfect the beats of your own narrative and to become who you were born to be. We must never cut out the most wonderful and powerful narrative arcs, the sections where we are forced to face the challenges on the road less travelled, to find ourselves lost in the darkness of the woods, for this is where we learn who and why we are. When we endure and resurface. To reach the truth we must endure the most complex aspects from the tales that complete us.

It’s a privilege to be a storyteller, there is no higher honour than to be engaged in creating ‘Strange Factories’ for you. I hope it will be a story that you will experience and perhaps one day in the future, it will come to haunt you.

"The silhouette of a large house. A light comes on in a upstairs window. The silhouette of a young woman. She raises her hand and waves, beckoning for the person watching to come towards the house."

This short essay originally appeared on Awakening Arts Network.

Strange Factories is currently on tour in the UK. 

http://www.uppcinema.com/film/strange-factories

Photograph by Yiannis Katsaris

‘Strange Factories’ is an independent feature film that tells the story of a writer trying to unfold the mystery of a fable in a world haunted by a phantasmagoric fiction.

My work as writer and director on ‘Strange Factories’ has afforded me the time to reflect on what it is to be a storyteller. In turn I’ve felt a deep connection grow within to the history of storytelling and the storytellers who left us long ago, but perhaps still exist in the narratives that will always be part of us. Their blood still courses through the stories that communicate the mystery at the heart of all our lives.

"Street lights cast shadows across the entrance to a theatre. The word EMETH is presented on an illuminated sign."

Why do we tell stories?

Humans literally told themselves into existence. We are constructed from a million narratives that have accompanied us across time, exhaled and etched on every conceivable surface, so that even in the darkest times we would never forget who we are.

What we call reality and every element in it is constructed from stories and myth. The surface of fiction is present everywhere.

What is physics if not a beautiful story, told in an intricate language of symbols and meaning that we’re still very much engaged in the act of telling, as we travel far deeper to the heart of its truth.

Every interaction and reaction in our lives are nodes of a story. Some stories we are part of, others we’re mere walk on characters, passing across the field of vision on the narrative plane of view.

We understand the nature of good and evil through the stories we are told as children and we mix these perspectives to become part of us as we age and travel through our lives. Sometimes we play the villain in another’s tale, the antagonist who comes to destroy. In other moments we are victims, martyrs or even a saviour and just once in a while we are the eternal hero. Reincarnated through mythic tales time and time again, a memory of something so powerful it will never fail the true memory of what we are.

"The Sun burns bright in the sky above a clearing in a forest. A crowd of people stand at the edge of the tree line, staring into the darkness that the trees hide."

For good and for bad, stories have changed my life, altering my perceptions of self, time, reality and fiction.

The stories that I have channelled as a writer have connected me to the world in a way that forces me to see the bright and hidden truths in the undercurrents of the fiction that ebb and flow all around us.

The best storytellers lose themselves inside their stories.

Some go insane at the sight of their own lives reflected back in the challenges their characters face and in turn come to learn how they too are a character in a grand tale that stretches beyond the confines of our lives and understanding.

"Through the eye holes of a mask we see the white pages are bright and give off luminosity."

The worse time I ever endured in my life, was a period of six years in my own story, where it felt like I was playing a character who held no truth, forced to exist in a formulaic story I had never intended to create. If my life had been a book during those years, I would have closed the cover and stopped reading.

Life has but one purpose: To tell the story of who we are honestly and to best of our ability, no matter the cost.

It takes time and effort to perfect the beats of your own narrative and to become who you were born to be. We must never cut out the most wonderful and powerful narrative arcs, the sections where we are forced to face the challenges on the road less travelled, to find ourselves lost in the darkness of the woods, for this is where we learn who and why we are. When we endure and resurface. To reach the truth we must endure the most complex aspects from the tales that complete us.

It’s a privilege to be a storyteller, there is no higher honour than to be engaged in creating ‘Strange Factories’ for you. I hope it will be a story that you will experience and perhaps one day in the future, it will come to haunt you.

"The silhouette of a large house. A light comes on in a upstairs window. The silhouette of a young woman. She raises her hand and waves, beckoning for the person watching to come towards the house."

This short essay originally appeared on Awakening Arts Network.

Strange Factories is currently on tour in the UK.

http://www.uppcinema.com/film/strange-factories

Photograph by Yiannis Katsaris

It is one of the puzzles of all magic that from time immemorial it has survived throughout history, through the coming and going of entire religions, the scientific and technological revolutions, and the triumphs of modern medicine. Despite all these changes, there has always been an unbroken tradition of magic. Why is magic so irrepressible and ineradicable, if it is also true that its claims never come true?

Or *do* they?

Hans Dieter Betz, The Greek Magical Papyri in Translation, p xlvii - xiviii (via coldalbion)

Reblogged from coldalbion

dippersnipnops:

sixpenceee:

lianneyy:

sixpenceee:

Japanese researchers on the Antarctic caught a humanoid-looking creature on camera. The creature is 30 meters height, all white with humanoid looking face.  A huge part of the Atlantic researchers share that they have witnessed humanoids with flippers and fins similar looking to a mermaid. In 2007 google blowed the network, releasing a picture of the whale-like creature that appeared in the south regions of Antarctica.

Since then, many versions try to explain the existence of the being. None had succeeded completely. The first 2 pictures are actual footage, the last one is an artists drawing of what it may look like. This beast is called the NINGEN. 

you know what I think?

oh my god best response to my post

The second picture looks like

(via decemberpaladin)

Source sixpenceee

Reblogged from sixpenceee

http://www.flickr.com/photos/analog/6941811928/sizes/h/in/photostream/

awkwardsituationist:

after an apparent attack by a fox, a street cat named bob was found injured and curled up in the hallway outside of a support housing flat in tottenham were james bowen, a recovering heroin addict and homeless busker, was staying. james took the cat in, got him to the rspca, and nursed him back to health using what little drug money he had for antibiotics.

but in the process, bob helped to nurse james back to health as well, giving him a reason to get up in the morning and get clean. since his recovery, bob has refused to leave james side, following him everywhere for the last six years.

thanks to a literary agent who passed him on the streets, james has since written an international bestselling book about his hardships and friendship with bob. “we’re two injured souls looking for someone we can trust,” james says. done in collaboration with the writer garry jenkins from an islington café, the book also attempts to dispel some of the social stigma that goes with homelessness.

photos by silvertony45 and analog photos

Had the pleasure of meeting Bob, such a special little guy.

(via ananke23)

Artist Zdzislaw Beksinski | via: devidsketchbook.com Artist Zdzislaw Beksinski | via: devidsketchbook.com Artist Zdzislaw Beksinski | via: devidsketchbook.com Artist Zdzislaw Beksinski | via: devidsketchbook.com

devidsketchbook:

THE BEAUTIFUL NIGHTMARES OF ZDZISLAW BEKSINSKI

Artist Zdzislaw Beksinski (24 February 1929 – 21 February 2005) was a renowned Polish painter, photographer, and sculptor. Beksiński executed his paintings and drawings either in what he called a ‘Baroque’ or a ‘Gothic’ manner. The first style is dominated by representation, with the best-known examples coming from his fantastic realism period when he painted disturbing images of a surrealistic, nightmarish environment. The second style is more abstract, being dominated by form, and is typified by Beksiński’s later paintings.

more: wikipedia beksinski facebook

(via ananke23)

Reblogged from devidsketchbook